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New research 883: Network dysfunction in CH, not hypothalamic?

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#1 Wed, 19/11/2014 - 16:06
PeterM
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New research 883: Network dysfunction in CH, not hypothalamic?

Neuroimage Clin. 2014 Oct 18;6:415-23. doi: 10.1016/j.nicl.2014.10.003. eCollection 2014.

Cortical plasticity in episodic and chronic cluster headache.

Naegel S1, Holle D1, Desmarattes N1, Theysohn N2, Diener HC1, Katsarava Z1, Obermann M1.

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Abstract

Cluster headache (CH) is characterized by recurrent episodes of excruciatingly painful, unilateral headache attacks typically accompanied by trigeminal autonomic symptoms. Due to its rhythm with alternating episodes of pain and no-pain, it is an excellent model to investigate whether structural brain changes detected by magnetic resonance based voxel-based-morphometry (VBM) reflect the cause of the disease, may be a consequence of the underlying disease other than pain, or may simply be caused by the sensation of pain itself. We investigated 91 patients with CH in different stages of their disease using VBM and compared them to 78 age- and gender-matched healthy controls. We detected distinct regional gray matter (GM) changes in different brain regions including the temporal lobe, the hippocampus, the insular cortex and the cerebellum. The extent, location and direction of observed GM alterations depended on the state of disease and appeared dynamic in relation to pain state (i.e., pain vs. no-pain). No hypothalamic changes were detected in CH patients compared to healthy controls. The GM changes observed in this study are highly dynamic and thereby reflect the cortical plasticity of the brain in regard to pain. This observed dynamic may provide an explanation of the diverse results of previous VBM studies in pain. Regarding CH the results suggest that the disease is more likely to be caused by a network dysfunction rather than by a single malfunctioning structure.

Not read it all yet, but can be found here: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4218933/

ATB
P.

Wed, 19/11/2014 - 22:34
Phil
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So, it might be like when you wire your speaker output to the Microphone?

_________________________________________________________________________ Yeah I know, my coat's already on.

Thu, 20/11/2014 - 16:09
PeterM
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If this is verified we'll have to re-write the website and the booklet :X

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