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Keeping a Cool Head - revisited 5 years on....

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#1 Sat, 18/02/2017 - 17:41
Mr Git
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Joined: 26/02/2014 - 14:34

Keeping a Cool Head - revisited 5 years on....

My original post was on the old forum. Just spotted this....

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/health/article-4236634/Ice-cap-save-cancer-pa...

Hmmm.....I wonder, could this be adapted for Mr Git??? Scratch one-s head

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Sat, 18/02/2017 - 18:14
Mr Git
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Joined: 26/02/2014 - 14:34

Ha! Just found my original post and it was 6 years ago! I feel old Sad

I don't even know if Polar Powder is still around to buy, I still have my original ones Biggrin

Another one for any newbies out there. Whilst this may all seem obvious when your head is clear, it’s not quite so easy when you’re going through a rough patch, particularly if you’re fairly new to all of this and are clambering up a steep learning curve.

Like a lot of sufferers I find that applying a cold compress during an attack can help. Over the years I’ve heard of all sorts of methods used to try and cool down an overheating clusterhead.

Like most sufferers my first port of call was the re-usable bag of frozen peas. However, it wasn’t long before I found these to be a bit impractical, particularly for long journeys. I figured there had to be a more scientific way of approaching this.

After a trip to Boots I ended up with a Gel Pad. Initially, these seemed to be more practical than the peas, but their main shortfall was that they froze like a solid block which was not conducive with molding around a curved head.

After some internet research we next tried wheat bags. These molded around my head much better. However, the problem with the wheat bags was that they weren’t cold enough.

Finally, after some further internet research, I discovered the solution that works best for me. Polar Powder Cold Pack is the one that ticks all the boxes for me. It’s similar in shape to a small pack of peas, but it contains a light blue powder (it’s ok, I don’t think it’s Columbian!) Shok

It stays really cold for ages and molds perfectly around your head. It’s really useful for taking on journeys or on holiday etc. Mrs Git has made some miniature pillow cases that fit perfectly to save having to wrap a tea towel around the Polar Powder.

When I’m in the worst part of my bout I supplement the Polar Powder with cold wet flannels. We now re-utilize the Gel Pads and wrap the cold wet flannels around the Gel Pads.

If you’re just starting out on your learning curve I hope this might help! Wink

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Sun, 19/02/2017 - 10:53
MissKittyB
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Last seen: 5 years 1 month ago
Joined: 29/03/2015 - 10:59

I use a Migra-Cap. This is basically a lycra hat with gel pads in it that you stick in the fridge until required. It can be pulled down to cover the eyes which is great. The good thing is that it leaves your hands free for injections, O2 calling the Samaritans or whatever.

It comes in a range of fetching colours and at the time, I thought it expensive for what it is. However having used it regularly for a number of years, I would recommend it. You look a bit of a twit, but do we care???? Wink

MissKittyB.

Sun, 19/02/2017 - 17:02
DavidH 7
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Last seen: 7 months 2 weeks ago
Joined: 26/02/2014 - 15:13

Interesting.  I much prefer warmth (as hot as I can tolerate without actally burning myself). 

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